prostatectomy

The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is a helpful measure in screening men for prostate cancer, a disease risk that increases considerably after age 50. At the same time, the test has limitations about which patients should be aware. The PSA test [...]

By Ryan Hatoum • October 18, 2017

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in July suggests that as many as 15 percent of patients who undergo treatment for prostate cancer later regret the treatment they choose. Dr. Christopher Saigal, vice chair of urology at UCLA, [...]

By Ryan Hatoum • August 18, 2017

Like many men diagnosed with prostate cancer, Bill Pickett faced a tough question when he came to UCLA for treatment: how to fight it? Prostate cancer is one of the more curable cancers — it has a 96 percent survival rate 15 years after diagnosis, according to the American Cancer Society.

By uclahealth • August 9, 2017

It was a routine, annual checkup for Ed Evans. His blood pressure and cholesterol levels were normal. Ed exercised regularly and watched his diet, so physically he was in great shape. Everything looked fine, until his blood work came back. The doctor explained that Ed’s PSA levels were dangerously high. That Spring afternoon in 2012, Ed learned that he had prostate cancer.

By uclahealth • June 12, 2014

When Bob Wong was deciding on a surgeon after his prostate cancer diagnosis, he made an analogy in his mind to basketball. “I’m putting the surgeon at the free-throw line in the game of my life,” Mr. Wong explains. “He has one shot to make the basket and win the game.”

By uclahealth • February 4, 2013

Eddie Carrillo experienced no symptoms that might have alerted him to his elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. But at a routine physical, Carrillo learned that his PSA was an alarming 4.5; normal is 1.0. Carrillo’s doctor told him it was likely he had prostate cancer, and that his prostate would have to be removed to prevent the cancer from spreading.

By uclahealth • October 4, 2012