Research

Considering an all-nighter? Pity your poor brain cells and skip it.

November 17th, 2017

Considering an all-nighter? Pity your poor brain cells and skip it.

By Elaine Schmidt elaineschmidt

People get too little sleep for lots of reasons. But whether you’re binge-watching Game of Thrones or nursing a colicky baby, the results are the same: you’re really tired the next day. Now a new UCLA study shows that your brain cells get sleepy, too. And that can lead to some serious spacing out… with […]

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Tags: brain cells, memory, neuronal firing, sleep, sleep deprivation, visual perception


Why concussions may impact female athletes differently

September 6th, 2017

Why concussions may impact female athletes differently

By David Olmos davidolmos

Scientists are learning more all the time about the differences between the female and male brain. So it’s perhaps not too surprising to know that athletes of different gender are impacted differently by brain injuries, such as concussions. Mayumi Prins, a professor of neurosurgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, is studying […]

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Tags: brain injury, childrens health, concussions, depression, exercise, mental health, Psychological stress, sports injuries, sports medicine, UCLA Brain Research Institute, women's health


Why do some people stay sharp as they age? Massive study may yield clues

August 1st, 2017

Why do some people stay sharp as they age? Massive study may yield clues

By Leigh Hopper leighhopper

Look closely at the brain scans above, and one of the first things you notice is how the ventricles – the dark, butterfly shapes in the middle of the brain — are much larger in the image labeled “old” than in the image labeled “young.” (The scans are from a 38-year-old and a 73-year-old.) You […]

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Tags: aging, brain, brain imaging study, cognition, functional MRI, menopause, MRI


Their goal: Taking the fear out of prenatal testing

July 25th, 2017

Their goal: Taking the fear out of prenatal testing

By Tami Dennis tamidennis

For pregnant women, the prospect of prenatal testing creates both hope and fear. The hope: That they’ll learn the gender of their unborn child and that it will be shown to be developing normally. The risk: That the test itself will create a health risk for them or their baby. New UCLA-led research could ultimately […]

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Tags: California nanoSystems Institute, Crump Institute, Hsian-Rong Tseng, prenatal testing, UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center


New book outlines two-step process for long-term behavior change

July 12th, 2017

New book outlines two-step process for long-term behavior change

By Enrique Rivero enriquerivero

When Sean Young was in graduate school, he received a visit one day from his brother. During the visit his brother became so overcome with pain that he had to be rushed to the hospital, where physicians discovered a burst intestine. The emergency surgery saved his life. The doctors told his brother, who suffered from […]

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Tags: behavior change, book, Sean Young, Stick with It, UC Institute for Prediction Technology, UCLA Center for Digital Behavior, UCLA Department of Family Medicine


A few facts about rheumatology at UCLA

June 15th, 2017

A few facts about rheumatology at UCLA

By Enrique Rivero enriquerivero

Most people think of rheumatology as the study of joint disorders, such as arthritis, but they may not know just how broad the field really is. Because rheumatologic disorders also affect blood vessels, organs and a host of other body parts, rheumatology research delves down into the effects on those systems as well. At UCLA, […]

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Tags: arthritis, bad cholesterol, cholesterol, Dr. John Fitzgerald, fibromyalgia, good cholesterol, gout, HDL, inflammatory diseases, joint pain, LDL, microbiome


Nervous system doesn't form as we thought; finding could aid nerve repair

June 7th, 2017

Nervous system doesn’t form as we thought; finding could aid nerve repair

By Tiare Dunlap tdunlap

It’s time to rewrite the textbooks. A new study from Samantha Butler of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA has overturned long-standing theory about how our nervous systems develop. Butler’s findings could lead to new medical treatments that help nerves regrow and reconnect – whether they’ve been […]

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Tags: axons, diabetes, nerve damage, nerve regeneration, nervous system, nervous system development, neurons, research, samantha butler, stem cells, UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center, veterans


Hope for a new treatment for ovarian cancer

May 8th, 2017

Hope for a new treatment for ovarian cancer

By Tiare Dunlap tdunlap

On World Ovarian Cancer Day, celebrated this year on May 8, women fighting the disease have new reason to hope. This international awareness day was created to build solidarity among women with ovarian cancer. For decades, researchers have been trying to unravel the mystery of why up to 85 percent of women who undergo the standard treatment […]

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Tags: advanced ovarian cancer, aggressive cancer, cancer research, cancer treatment, Dr. Sanaz Memarzadeh, epithelial ovarian cancer, gynecologic cancer, gynecologic oncology, Ovarian Cancer, ovarian cancer research, UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center, women's health


The secret to fighting Zika could exist in our own immune systems

May 5th, 2017

The secret to fighting Zika could exist in our own immune systems

By Tiare Dunlap tdunlap

Fourteen months after the Zika virus was declared a global health emergency, the long-term effects of the virus – and the neurological damage linked to it – are only now beginning to be understood. As Zika infections continue to spread, researchers around the world are working to expose the virus’ vulnerabilities. New research published  by […]

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Tags: 25-hydroxycholestrol, brain health, brain structure, brain tissue, Ebola, hepatitis C, HIV, immune system, immunization, UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center, Zika, zika virus


2017 UCLA Cannabis Research Symposium

April 20th, 2017

2017 UCLA Cannabis Research Symposium

By uclahealth uclahealth

The UCLA Brain Research Institute, Semel Institute, and UCLA Cannabinoid Affinity Group are proud to present: Inaugural 2017 UCLA Cannabis Research Symposium Thu, April 20, 2017 8:00 am – 4:00 pm PDT Join us for a historic series of talks from visiting speakers and UCLA faculty about the science of cannabis, cannabinoids, and the endocannnabinoid […]

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Tags: Cannabidiol, cannabis, Cannabis Research, Chronic Pain, Dr. Christopher Evans, Dr. Donald Tashkin, Dr. Igor Spigelman, Dr. Michael Roth, Dr. Ravi Aysola, Dr. Shaun Hussain, Dr. Thomas Strouse, Dr. Timothy Fong