Research

March 15, 2019

Women of UCLA Health: Trailblazers in health care, medicine and science

By uclahealth uclahealth

March is Women’s History Month, which “honors and celebrates the struggles and achievements of American women throughout the history of the United States.” We take this opportunity to recognize the many contributions women have made to the fabric of our nation, including in the fields of medicine and science. This observance traces its roots to 1981, […]

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Tags: biobehavioral sciences, Health Care Leader to Know, Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center, Neurological Surgery, nurse practitioner, Precision Medicine, psychiatry, public health, thoracic imaging, UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital, women leaders in health care


50+? Get Screened

March 4, 2019

50+? Get Screened

By uclahealth uclahealth

“Colon cancer is the second most common cause of cancer related death and the really unique thing is that it’s largely preventable,” says Dr. Fola May, assistant professor of medicine and physician-scientist. “You’d think people would take advantage of screening modalities to catch it early, but only 60% of the population participated in screenings, despite […]

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Tags: cancer, colon cancer, colonoscopy, colorectal cancer screening, Dr. Fola May, featured


Life-Saving ECMO Machine

July 13, 2018

Life-Saving ECMO Machine

By uclahealth uclahealth

“We are able to deliver an advanced therapy which replaces the function of the heart and lungs in a patient whose organs are failing,” says Dr. Peyman Benharash, associate professor of surgery and bioengineering and director of the adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation program at UCLA. “The ECMO machine allows the other organs to stay alive […]

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Tags: adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation program, advanced therapy, Dr. Peyman Benharash, ECMO, heart and lungs, transplant


After FDA approves first drug made from marijuana, what happens next?

July 11, 2018

After FDA approves first drug made from marijuana, what happens next?

By Leigh Hopper leighhopper

On June 25, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first drug made from marijuana – Epidiolex — to treat two rare and devastating forms of epilepsy, Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Dr. Shaun Hussain, a pediatric neurologist at UCLA who treats children with epilepsy, believes the medication will be a game-changer for many […]

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Making a Difference

June 13, 2018

Making a Difference

By heatherdawn hacidera

As a board member for Bruin Beans Health Club (BBHC), the Kidney Health Fair at the beach served as our main outreach event for the 2017-2018 school year. Months prior to this event, members of BBHC worked closely with Dr. Anjay Rastogi’s research office as well as the CORE Kidney team in planning this fair, […]

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Tags: Bruin Beans Health Club, CORE Kidney team, Dr. Anjay Rastogi, featured, Kidney Health Fair, patient stories


Ask the Doctors - Is my love of coffee genetic?

April 23, 2018

Ask the Doctors – Is my love of coffee genetic?

By Ask the Doctors askthedoctors

Dear Doctors: Everyone in my partner’s family loves coffee but I’m like the rest of my family  – we can take it or leave it. Is it possible that a love of caffeine is in their genes? According to the National Institutes of Health, caffeine is the most widely used stimulant on earth. Found in […]

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Tags: adenosine, Ask the Doctors, coffee, DNA, Dr. Eve Glazier, Dr.Elizabeth Ko


April 11, 2018

Research data and support systems

By MaryBeth63 mhines

Dr. Mihaela Taylor has recently put together group meetings for her patients that have both rheumatology issues and fibromyalgia. In these meetings, she reviews the latest research and information to help us self-manage our disease in addition to the steps that she takes during our 1:1 appointments. The groups also get a chance to talk […]

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Tags: Dr. Alan Fogelman, Dr. Mihaela Taylor, fibromyalgia, patient stories, research, rheumatology


Stem cell discovery may help conquer pediatric germ cell tumors

February 9, 2018

Stem cell discovery may help conquer pediatric germ cell tumors

By Tiare Dunlap tdunlap

Cancer treatments often come with a trade-off: They beat back the disease, only to leave a host of side effects in its place. Some of those side effects – such as chemotherapy-related infertility – can be permanent and life changing. Patients with germ cell tumors know this trade-off well. Such tumors, which begin in the […]

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Tags: cancer, cancer treatment, cancer treatments, chemotherapy, childhood cancer, childrens health, germ cell tumors, germ cells, infertility, Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA, pediatric cancer, pediatrics


November 29, 2017

Fight On

By G1951 oldramsfan

Initially it was quite a shock that I had any kind of thyroid cancer, however the journey has been a challenge, not an ordeal. Along the way I’ve been nurtured, doctored by some wonderful people. I would say to any, if you feel a lump, don’t put it off, address it right away. I failed […]

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Tags: blood pressure, blood test, cancer, cancer tumor board, Dr. Deborah Wong, Dr. Michael Wong, Dr. Michael Yeh, Endocrine Center, endocrinology, lung nodules, lymph nodes, neck dissection


Considering an all-nighter? Pity your poor brain cells and skip it.

November 17, 2017

Considering an all-nighter? Pity your poor brain cells and skip it.

By Elaine Schmidt elaineschmidt

People get too little sleep for lots of reasons. But whether you’re binge-watching Game of Thrones or nursing a colicky baby, the results are the same: you’re really tired the next day. Now a new UCLA study shows that your brain cells get sleepy, too. And that can lead to some serious spacing out… with […]

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Tags: brain cells, memory, neuronal firing, sleep, sleep deprivation, visual perception