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UCLA nutrition experts to share latest findings at upcoming conference

September 15th, 2017

UCLA nutrition experts to share latest findings at upcoming conference

By Ryan Hatoum rhatoum

The 11th Congress of the International Society of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics will take place September 16-19, 2017, at UCLA Luskin Conference Center. The conference will feature presentations from international researchers about how genes and nutrients impact health and disease. Conference topics will include: diet and the microbiome; genes, nutrients, and cancer; the future of medicine; […]

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Tags: dr zhaoping li, nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, nutrition


'Edible' 106-year-old fruitcake discovery raises question: how long do frozen foods actually keep?

September 7th, 2017

‘Edible’ 106-year-old fruitcake discovery raises question: how long do frozen foods actually keep?

By Ryan Hatoum rhatoum

While some of us are wondering whether those frozen veggies sitting in the back of our freezer are still good, conservators in Antarctica recently uncovered a 106-year-old, “almost” edible fruitcake preserved in ice. To be sure, you shouldn’t wait for your frozen foods to join the centenarian club before you make use of them, but […]

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Tags: Dana Hunnes, dietician, dietitian, food, healthy food, nutrition


September 6th, 2017

Why concussions may impact female athletes differently

By David Olmos davidolmos

Scientists are learning more all the time about the differences between the female and male brain. So it’s perhaps not too surprising to know that athletes of different gender are impacted differently by brain injuries, such as concussions. Mayumi Prins, a professor of neurosurgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, is studying […]

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Tags: brain injury, childrens health, concussions, depression, exercise, mental health, Psychological stress, sports injuries, sports medicine, UCLA Brain Research Institute, women's health


A doctor's note for sunscreen at school? Why that's a mistake

August 23rd, 2017

A doctor’s note for sunscreen at school? Why that’s a mistake

By Ryan Hatoum rhatoum

An estimated 80 percent of a person’s exposure to ultraviolet radiation — most of it from sunlight — occurs before the age of 18. Sunscreen is one of our primary defense mechanisms against ultraviolet radiation, but schools across the United States face a challenge because the Food and Drug Administration classifies sunscreen as an over-the-counter […]

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Tags: back to school, broad-spectrum sunscreen, dermatology, Marcia Hogeling, melanoma, pediatric, pediatric dermatology, pediatrics, skin cancer, skin care, SPF, sun


Disgusted by your appearance? The problem may reside in your brain, not your looks

August 21st, 2017

Disgusted by your appearance? The problem may reside in your brain, not your looks

By Leigh Hopper leighhopper

You hate your nose even though your friends tell you that it looks normal, even attractive. You check mirrors and feel shame for being vain. You may even suspect the problem is psychological, but you think that your best solution is to fix your nose rather than address your mental health. This is how body […]

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Tags: body dysmorphic disorder, body image, mental health, psychiatry, suicide


How prostate cancer patients can choose a treatment they won't regret

August 18th, 2017

How prostate cancer patients can choose a treatment they won’t regret

By Ryan Hatoum rhatoum

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in July suggests that as many as 15 percent of patients who undergo treatment for prostate cancer later regret the treatment they choose. Dr. Christopher Saigal, vice chair of urology at UCLA, is trying to fix that. Prostate cancer is one of the more curable cancers […]

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Tags: cancer, clinical trial, clinical trials, Dr. Christopher Saigal, men's health, patient care, personalized medicine, prostate, prostate cancer, prostatectomy, surgery, urology


No need to think pink to boost breast milk, but it can't hurt

August 17th, 2017

No need to think pink to boost breast milk, but it can’t hurt

By Tami Dennis tamidennis

Breastfeeding moms, especially new ones, often worry about whether or not they’re producing enough milk to help their infants thrive. They search for, and compare notes on, any dietary edge they can find. Now some have hit upon a perhaps unusual recommendation:  The Starbucks Pink Drink. Technically, the drink is  called a Strawberry Acai Refreshers […]

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Tags: breastfeeding, Leena Nathan, Starbucks Pink Drink, tips for breastfeeding


Protecting kids against HPV before cancer risk increases

August 15th, 2017

Protecting kids against HPV before cancer risk increases

By Reggie Kumar reggiekumar

Some parents remain hesitant to get their children vaccinated for the human papilloma virus, despite assurances by medical experts that the recommended shots are both highly safe and effective. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the vaccine to protect females between the ages of 9 and 26 and males between the ages of 9 and […]

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Tags: adolescent cancer, cervical cancer, colorectal cancer, HPV, HPV vaccine


A college woman’s guide to feminine health

August 15th, 2017

A college woman’s guide to feminine health

By Amy Albin amyalbin

Heading off to college is an exciting time for young women moving away from home for the first time. Living with roommates, making new friends and juggling classes are all part of the experience. This new sense of independence should also include taking charge of one’s own health, says Dr. Aparna Sridhar, an assistant professor […]

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Tags: birth control, bladder, campus life, college, Dr. Aparna Sridhar, feminine health, good hygiene, gynecology, HPV, HPV vaccine, LGBTQ, menstrual cycles


Why do some people stay sharp as they age? Massive study may yield clues

August 1st, 2017

Why do some people stay sharp as they age? Massive study may yield clues

By Leigh Hopper leighhopper

Look closely at the brain scans above, and one of the first things you notice is how the ventricles – the dark, butterfly shapes in the middle of the brain — are much larger in the image labeled “old” than in the image labeled “young.” (The scans are from a 38-year-old and a 73-year-old.) You […]

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Tags: aging, brain, brain imaging study, cognition, functional MRI, menopause, MRI