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Considering an all-nighter? Pity your poor brain cells and skip it.

November 17th, 2017

Considering an all-nighter? Pity your poor brain cells and skip it.

By Elaine Schmidt elaineschmidt

People get too little sleep for lots of reasons. But whether you’re binge-watching Game of Thrones or nursing a colicky baby, the results are the same: you’re really tired the next day. Now a new UCLA study shows that your brain cells get sleepy, too. And that can lead to some serious spacing out… with […]

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Tags: brain cells, memory, neuronal firing, sleep, sleep deprivation, visual perception


For children with autism, sleep is the essential ingredient in any treatment plan

November 17th, 2017

For children with autism, sleep is the essential ingredient in any treatment plan

By Leigh Hopper leighhopper

When Dr. Shafali Jeste first started seeing children through UCLA’s Developmental Neurogenetics Clinic, she expected most visits to focus on the medical management of epilepsy, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, or behavioral challenges. Jeste, a behavioral child neurologist, specializes in children with rare genetic variants and syndromes associated with autism spectrum disorder. Almost half of her patients […]

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Tags: autism, insomnia, neurology, pediatric neurology


Exploring the impact of HIV/AIDS on black women

November 16th, 2017

Exploring the impact of HIV/AIDS on black women

By Enrique Rivero enriquerivero

The impact of HIV/AIDS on black women has received little attention over the years, which has prompted Gail Wyatt to try to do something about it. Wyatt, a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, and an associate director of the UCLA AIDS Institute, recently helped […]

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Tags: African American women, AIDS, black women, Gail Wyatt, HIV, mental health, reproductive health, Semel Institute, sexually-transmitted infections, STDs, STIs, testing


Operation Mend patients to travel to New York City for nation’s largest Veterans Day parade

November 8th, 2017

Operation Mend patients to travel to New York City for nation’s largest Veterans Day parade

By Amy Albin amyalbin

Cities around the nation will hold Veterans Day parades on Nov. 11 to honor U.S. military veterans. The biggest parade of all will be in New York City, where more than 40,000 participants, cheered on by hundreds of thousands of spectators, are expected to march along a 1.3-mile route on Fifth Avenue. And, for the […]

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Tags: intensive treatment program, physical rehabilitation, PTSD, TBI, UCLA Health Operation Mend, Veterans Day, Warrior Care Network, Wounded Veterans, Wounded Warrior Project


As hepatitis A cases grow in California, prevention requires both personal and public actions

November 7th, 2017

As hepatitis A cases grow in California, prevention requires both personal and public actions

By Enrique Rivero enriquerivero

The number of hepatitis A cases in California just keeps growing. Some 633 cases have been detected as of Oct. 27, with 416 hospitalizations and 21 deaths linked to the outbreak, according to the California Department of Public Health. It is the largest person-to-person hepatitis A outbreak – not stemming from a common source or […]

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Tags: Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, hep A, hepatitis a, infectious diseases, outbreak, public health


How much candy is too much on Halloween?

October 31st, 2017

How much candy is too much on Halloween?

By Ryan Hatoum rhatoum

With candy practically falling from the sky on Halloween, many kids will overindulge on sugary sweets during all the festivities. While that can be part of the fun of the holiday, there are plenty of ways to enjoy candy without overdoing it, says Dana Hunnes, senior dietitian at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and adjunct […]

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Tags: added sugar, candy, children, Dana Hunnes, diet, dietitian, Halloween, holiday, holiday diet, nutrition, pediatrics, sugar


Dribble for the Cure annual event raises more than $192,000 to combat pediatric cancer

October 25th, 2017

Dribble for the Cure annual event raises more than $192,000 to combat pediatric cancer

By Ryan Hatoum rhatoum

UCLA’s 10th annual Dribble for the Cure event, a rally generating funds for the research and treatment of pediatric cancer, drew over 1,200 participants and $192,000 — a record on both counts compared to past years. Each year, participants gather on UCLA’s campus and dribble basketballs alongside the UCLA men’s and women’s basketball teams. This […]

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Tags: Dr. Theodore Bruce Moore, Dr. Theodore Moore, dribble for the cure


Flu shot tips from a nurse

October 20th, 2017

Flu shot tips from a nurse

By Amy Albin amyalbin

Feeling squeamish about getting your annual flu shot? We asked an expert for some advice in making the uncomfortable experience a little bit easier. Nurse Janet Li-Tall has given thousands of flu shots in her 11 years working at the Occupational Health department of UCLA Health. She likes giving them because it protects the staff […]

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Tags: flu shot, flu vaccination, Flu vaccine, immunization, nurse, nursing, Occupational Health, seasonal flu


PSA test results can be affected by different factors

October 18th, 2017

PSA test results can be affected by different factors

By Ryan Hatoum rhatoum

The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is a helpful measure in screening men for prostate cancer, a disease risk that increases considerably after age 50. At the same time, the test has limitations about which patients should be aware. The PSA test does not specifically check for prostate cancer itself, but rather for the presence of […]

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Tags: cancer, cancer screening, Dr. Christopher Saigal, men's health, prostate, prostate cancer, prostate cancer screening prostatitis, prostate-specific antigen, prostatectomy, prostatic hyperplasia, PSA, PSA levels


At Celebration of Life event, cancer patients share their stories of their transplant journey

October 12th, 2017

At Celebration of Life event, cancer patients share their stories of their transplant journey

By uclahealth uclahealth

By Amy Albin Kathryn Naftzger, 21, still remembers the shock of being diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in April 2016. Over the course of her treatment she experienced good days, bad days and others that fell somewhere in between. She suffered fainting spells, fevers, pancreatitis, swollen cheeks and more. But she also enjoyed many milestones: […]

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Tags: acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, blood cancer, bone marrow cancer, bone marrow transplant, Burkitt lymphoma, cancer, multiple myeloma, stem-cell transplant, UCLA bone marrow and stem cell transplant program