News & Insights

Subscribe to our RSS feed.

Pediatricians and public health professionals must collaborate for the greater good

January 22nd, 2018

Pediatricians and public health professionals must collaborate for the greater good

By Ryan Hatoum rhatoum

The water contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan, was first exposed publicly when pediatrician Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha held a news conference addressing the alarming levels of lead she and her colleagues were seeing in patients’ blood. The Centers for Disease Control and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) worked together to recognize the link between the […]

View full entry

Tags: American Academy of Pediatrics, children, dr. alice kuo, pediatrician, Pediatricians, pediatrics, policy, public health


Rare surgery helps LAPD motorcycle officer with rare injury

January 19th, 2018

Rare surgery helps LAPD motorcycle officer with rare injury

By Amy Albin amyalbin

Phrenic nerve damaged in traffic accident made it difficult to breathe, potentially ending his career Collisions are not uncommon for motorcycle officers who spend most of their time on the road. Officer Eric Holtz of the Los Angeles Police Department knows this first-hand. In July 2014, Holtz was riding westbound on Saticoy Street towards Sepulveda […]

View full entry

Tags: breathing issues, diaphragm, Dr. Matthew Kaufman, Dr. Reza Jarrahy, phrenic nerve injury, plastic and reconstructive surgery, plastic surgery, reconstructive surgery, scar tissue, shortness of breath, surgery, UCLA Plastic Surgery


Have the flu? Know when to go. To the ER, that is.

January 19th, 2018

Have the flu? Know when to go. To the ER, that is.

By Philip Hampton phampton

Flu-stricken patients are jamming emergency rooms across California and the country. Flu patients feel terrible. But at what point should they head to the hospital? Many visit at the first sign of sniffling. Others wait until there’s no choice. For guidance, we checked in with Dr. Mark Morocco, a supervising emergency physician at Ronald Reagan […]

View full entry

Tags: Dr. Mark Morocco, emergency department, flu, flu season, flu shot, flu shots, Flu strains, Flu vaccine, h3n2


How to have a healthy new year with diabetes: 5 tips

January 5th, 2018

How to have a healthy new year with diabetes: 5 tips

By Simi Singer simisinger

Let’s be honest. Nearly everyone has a health-related resolution for 2018. But with diabetes a growing epidemic and one of the leading causes of death in the country, it is especially important that diabetics – already more than 10 percent of the population — make a commitment to improving their health this year. “Diabetes doubles […]

View full entry

Tags: diabetes, endocrinology, metabolism, new years resolutions, Susan Ahern MD, UCLA Division of Endocrinology, UCLA endocrinologist, UCLA Health Ventura


A cup of hot tea a day could keep glaucoma away

December 20th, 2017

A cup of hot tea a day could keep glaucoma away

By Elaine Schmidt elaineschmidt

Sipping a mug of piping hot tea on a cold day doesn’t just warm you up—it may also protect your vision. That’s the good news from a new UCLA study, which found a daily cup of hot tea may reduce your risk by up to 74 percent of developing glaucoma, one of the leading causes of […]

View full entry

Tags: Anne Coleman, caffeine, coffee, cola, decaf, eye health, glaucoma, hot tea, iced tea, UCLA Stein Eye Institute, vision


New discoveries may help researchers better treat pulmonary hypertension

December 19th, 2017

New discoveries may help researchers better treat pulmonary hypertension

By Ryan Hatoum rhatoum

New UCLA research suggesting that the Y chromosome protects against pulmonary hypertension provides a new avenue for potential treatments for the disease. The study, published in September in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, found that genes on the Y chromosome reduced the likelihood that mice developed the disease. Because pulmonary hypertension has […]

View full entry

Tags: anesthesiology, christine cunningham, chromosomes, dr. soban umar, genes, mansoureh eghbali, organ donation, organ donations, organ transplant, organ transplants, perioperative medicine, pulmonary hypertension


December 13th, 2017

After a head injury, mental battle proves difficult for some student-athletes

By David Olmos davidolmos

Flickr/Richard Owens For some student-athletes who suffer concussions, the mental aspect of getting back in the game is the toughest part. Researchers at UCLA are looking closely at the psychological aspects of recovery from head injuries, such as concussions, and have recently begun a program that integrates a common type of talk therapy as part […]

View full entry


Hospitalized this holiday season? It’s okay to feel sad

December 11th, 2017

Hospitalized this holiday season? It’s okay to feel sad

By Amy Albin amyalbin

No one wants to be hospitalized, especially during the holidays. Separation from family and friends and missing out on traditional activities such as shopping for gifts, baking special treats and attending celebrations and religious events can make a patient feel sad. “It’s not uncommon for people to have the blues around the holiday season and […]

View full entry

Tags: blues, coping, coping mechanisms, Holiday blues, hospitalization, Rev. Karen Schnell, sadness, spiritual care


Codeine isn't safe for kids. Here's how doctors can ease pain instead

December 7th, 2017

Codeine isn’t safe for kids. Here’s how doctors can ease pain instead

By Ryan Hatoum rhatoum

Five years ago the U.S. Food and Drug Administration declared codeine unsafe for treating post-surgical pain in children, such as surgery to remove the tonsils or adenoids. But years later, some doctors still prescribe codeine for children, a potentially dangerous practice, says Dr. Nina Shapiro, director of pediatric otolaryngology at UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital. Codeine […]

View full entry

Tags: acetaminophen, codeine, Dr. Nina Shapiro, ibuprofen, oxycodone, pain, pain management, pain medication, tonsillectomy, tonsils


Got bedroom eyes?  You may qualify for corrective surgery

December 5th, 2017

Got bedroom eyes? You may qualify for corrective surgery

By Elaine Schmidt elaineschmidt

Lots of people have bedroom eyes – a lazy, heavy-lidded gaze that conjures up seduction. But if you’re 50 or older and your lids remain half-closed when you open your eyes, you may be a candidate for surgery to correct ptosis (pron: toe-sis), or droopy upper eyelids. Insurance often covers some of the cost of […]

View full entry

Tags: aging eyes, droopy eyelids, ptosis, saggy eyelids