David Geffen School of Medicine

A cup of hot tea a day could keep glaucoma away

December 20, 2017

A cup of hot tea a day could keep glaucoma away

By Elaine Schmidt elaineschmidt

Sipping a mug of piping hot tea on a cold day doesn’t just warm you up—it may also protect your vision. That’s the good news from a new UCLA study, which found a daily cup of hot tea may reduce your risk by up to 74 percent of developing glaucoma, one of the leading causes of […]

View full entry

Tags: Anne Coleman, caffeine, coffee, cola, decaf, eye health, glaucoma, hot tea, iced tea, UCLA Stein Eye Institute, vision


November 29, 2017

Fight On

By G1951 oldramsfan

Initially it was quite a shock that I had any kind of thyroid cancer, however the journey has been a challenge, not an ordeal. Along the way I’ve been nurtured, doctored by some wonderful people. I would say to any, if you feel a lump, don’t put it off, address it right away. I failed […]

View full entry

Tags: blood pressure, blood test, cancer, cancer tumor board, Dr. Deborah Wong, Dr. Michael Wong, Dr. Michael Yeh, Endocrine Center, endocrinology, lung nodules, lymph nodes, neck dissection


Considering an all-nighter? Pity your poor brain cells and skip it.

November 17, 2017

Considering an all-nighter? Pity your poor brain cells and skip it.

By Elaine Schmidt elaineschmidt

People get too little sleep for lots of reasons. But whether you’re binge-watching Game of Thrones or nursing a colicky baby, the results are the same: you’re really tired the next day. Now a new UCLA study shows that your brain cells get sleepy, too. And that can lead to some serious spacing out… with […]

View full entry

Tags: brain cells, memory, neuronal firing, sleep, sleep deprivation, visual perception


As hepatitis A cases grow in California, prevention requires both personal and public actions

November 7, 2017

As hepatitis A cases grow in California, prevention requires both personal and public actions

By Enrique Rivero enriquerivero

The number of hepatitis A cases in California just keeps growing. Some 633 cases have been detected as of Oct. 27, with 416 hospitalizations and 21 deaths linked to the outbreak, according to the California Department of Public Health. It is the largest person-to-person hepatitis A outbreak – not stemming from a common source or […]

View full entry

Tags: Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, hep A, hepatitis a, infectious diseases, outbreak, public health


Why concussions may impact female athletes differently

September 6, 2017

Why concussions may impact female athletes differently

By David Olmos davidolmos

Scientists are learning more all the time about the differences between the female and male brain. So it’s perhaps not too surprising to know that athletes of different gender are impacted differently by brain injuries, such as concussions. Mayumi Prins, a professor of neurosurgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, is studying […]

View full entry

Tags: brain injury, childrens health, concussions, depression, exercise, mental health, Psychological stress, sports injuries, sports medicine, UCLA Brain Research Institute, women's health


New book outlines two-step process for long-term behavior change

July 12, 2017

New book outlines two-step process for long-term behavior change

By Enrique Rivero enriquerivero

When Sean Young was in graduate school, he received a visit one day from his brother. During the visit his brother became so overcome with pain that he had to be rushed to the hospital, where physicians discovered a burst intestine. The emergency surgery saved his life. The doctors told his brother, who suffered from […]

View full entry

Tags: behavior change, book, Sean Young, Stick with It, UC Institute for Prediction Technology, UCLA Center for Digital Behavior, UCLA Department of Family Medicine


What space-traveling mice could mean for people with osteoporosis

July 11, 2017

What space-traveling mice could mean for people with osteoporosis

By Tiare Dunlap tdunlap

Early in the morning of July 3, 2017, 20 intrepid mice returned to Earth from the International Space Station aboard SpaceX’s Dragon capsule, splashing down in the Pacific Ocean off Baja, California. This landing marked the completion of a 28-hour journey back to Earth – and the first time live rodents have returned to the […]

View full entry

Tags: bone density, Bone mass, experimental drug trial, international space station, nasa, osteoporosis, research, space, stem cells, UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center


A few facts about rheumatology at UCLA

June 15, 2017

A few facts about rheumatology at UCLA

By Enrique Rivero enriquerivero

Most people think of rheumatology as the study of joint disorders, such as arthritis, but they may not know just how broad the field really is. Because rheumatologic disorders also affect blood vessels, organs and a host of other body parts, rheumatology research delves down into the effects on those systems as well. At UCLA, […]

View full entry

Tags: arthritis, bad cholesterol, cholesterol, Dr. John Fitzgerald, fibromyalgia, good cholesterol, gout, HDL, inflammatory diseases, joint pain, LDL, microbiome


The secret to fighting Zika could exist in our own immune systems

May 5, 2017

The secret to fighting Zika could exist in our own immune systems

By Tiare Dunlap tdunlap

Fourteen months after the Zika virus was declared a global health emergency, the long-term effects of the virus – and the neurological damage linked to it – are only now beginning to be understood. As Zika infections continue to spread, researchers around the world are working to expose the virus’ vulnerabilities. New research published  by […]

View full entry

Tags: 25-hydroxycholestrol, brain health, brain structure, brain tissue, Ebola, hepatitis C, HIV, immune system, immunization, UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center, Zika, zika virus


Kidney transplant and donation education goes national

March 28, 2017

Kidney transplant and donation education goes national

By Enrique Rivero enriquerivero

Have you ever wondered why people choose to donate a kidney? And whether these donors regret their decision later? Amy Waterman first became interested in organ donation over 20 years ago when she conducted surveys of kidney donors as a graduate student in social psychology at Washington University in St. Louis. “It was amazing that […]

View full entry

Tags: education, Explore Transplant, kidney transplant, living donation, living donors, living kidney donation, nephrology, organ donation, Transplant Research and Education Center, transplantation, TREC, United Network for Organ Sharing