Items Tagged ‘UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior’

ChatterBaby, an app that helps parents know when and why their baby is crying, used in new research

December 30, 2019

ChatterBaby, an app that helps parents know when and why their baby is crying, used in new research

By uclahealth uclahealth

ChatterBaby, a mobile app developed at UCLA that analyzes the acoustics of a baby’s cry to identify it as fussy, hungry or painful, has been used in new research exploring the ‘mystery’ crying of colic. The cause of colic – episodes when an otherwise healthy infant cries for three to four hours a day for […]

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Tags: ChatterBaby app, Dr. Ariana Anderson, UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior


Exploring the impact of HIV/AIDS on black women

November 16, 2017

Exploring the impact of HIV/AIDS on black women

By Enrique Rivero Enrique Rivero

The impact of HIV/AIDS on black women has received little attention over the years, which has prompted Gail Wyatt to try to do something about it. Wyatt, a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, and an associate director of the UCLA AIDS Institute, recently helped […]

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Tags: African American women, AIDS, black women, Gail Wyatt, HIV, mental health, reproductive health, Semel Institute, sexually-transmitted infections, STDs, STIs, testing


For schizophrenia patients, exercise can be a powerful therapy

April 11, 2016

For schizophrenia patients, exercise can be a powerful therapy

By Meg Sullivan Meg Sullivan

Van Nuys maintenance worker Marco Tapia had a schizophrenic breakdown at age 24. His family thought he had been taking drugs because he was acting so … strange. When he tried to use a window instead of the door to get into their Van Nuys apartment, they realized something was terribly wrong. His parents then […]

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Tags: antipsychotic medications, exercise, mental health, mental illness, schizophrenia, UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA’s Aftercare Research Program