UCLA Health Connect feed

judy12

Recently active
Wed, Feb 8 at 12:00am PDT by @judy12 · View  

Vivian's Heart Journey

The chances of winning the Powerball are 1 in 992 Billion. The chances of having a child with a heart defect are 1 in 100. About 1 out of every 100 babies (approximately 40,000) born each year in the US have some type of Congenital Heart Defect (CHD). Each year worldwide, 100,000 babies under the age of one, will not live to celebrate their first birthday. The cause of most congenital heart defects is unknown.

Vivian is 1 in 100. She was diagnosed with a complex case of CHD that required a series of open heart surgeries; the first of which was when she was 10 days old, weighing a mere 4 [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
gmasgras

11 hours ago by @gmasgras · View  

Ophthalmologists Say 90 Percent of Work-Related Eye Injuries Can be Avoided by Wearing Eye Protection

On-the-job safety goes well beyond avoiding slips, falls, and heavy lifting. Caring for your eyes should be a high priority and part of an overall workplace wellness routine. This is important because each day, about 2,000 U.S. workers sustain a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. However, 90 percent of these accidents can be avoided by wearing eye protection. As part of an ongoing effort to stress the importance of workplace eye wellness, the UCLA Stein Eye and Doheny Eye Institutes and the American Academy of Ophthalmology, during the month of March, are encouraging the public to do right by their eyes and wear appropriate eye protection. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
djpatel31

11 hours ago by @djpatel31 · View  

This is bigger than me

As someone born with a rare heart defect, pulmonary atresia, and having had a stroke at the age of 4, I recognize how important healthcare innovation has been in playing a role in giving me a chance at a normal life. To put that in perspective about 1 in every 10,000 babies is born with this defect and I am one of them.

I also have a younger cousin who shares this condition with me, and if you consider the odds, it’s pretty crazy! So you see, just from that alone, I have more than enough motivation to care about the future of healthcare.

My mother has schizophrenia, depression, and diabetes. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
pammy duck

13 hours ago by @pammy duck · View  

Dr Y. Michael Shino, My Bilateral Lung Transplant Pulmonologist

It has been almost two years now since my local pulmonologist, Dr A. Munoz from Bakersfield, Calif. referred me to UCLA for a double lung transplant. After my initial shock, I came to UCLA with an open mind about the transplant. The thing is, I am a nurse. As an Operating Room RN, now retired since 2007, one might imagine how that helped to understand the transplant process, yet, since transplant is so specialized it was not so black and white. Sometimes I had too many questions about the smallest details about the surgery, the medications and just about everything in between. Patients want to know, in my case, I wanted to know everything ! [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
paulb

13 hours ago by @paulb · View  

Precision medical care from brilliant, caring experts

My UCLA Health hematologist Tina Wang, MD, is a brilliant scientist, zeroing in immediately on root causes with diagnostics and tests selected specifically to identify my problem(s). She proactively works with my other doctors to coordinate diagnosis and treatment that provides what amounts to integrated care, even though they are not in the same practice, yet goes beyond just the medical specialty I first visited her for. Her excellent training is evident in how she communicates appropriately and clearly, providing details needed for understanding and confirming that the information is understood by the patient and their family. She is respectful of patient's time and privacy while unhesitating to probe for any information relevant to her patient's health and providing counsel on treatment. She [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
myangel

13 hours ago by @myangel · View  

The words "thank you" just aren't enough for this wonderful doctor

A few years ago, after being sick for over a year, I was referred to Dr. Eric Esrailian at UCLA. I clearly remember the first day when I saw Dr. Esrailian. It was like an angel walked into the room. After examining my records and talking to me for nearly an hour, he said, "I guarantee you, I will make you well." Near tears, I felt such hope. Dr. Esrailian did not let me down. He did "make me well" again. He is my angel! I am so grateful to Dr. Eric Esrailian. The words "thank you" just aren't even enough for this truly kind and brilliant doctor!

Login here to comment.
marianmcdonell

15 hours ago by @marianmcdonell · View  

Just a Thank You Will Do

Transferred from Santa Monica to Redondo Beach and chose Dr. Jason A. Hove as my primary care physician.  My cardiologist, Dr. Gopi Manthripragada is the one who suggested that I change to the South Bay since I live in Signal Hill, Calif. It has been a good experience to have both these doctors care for me.

Login here to comment.
sharonjc

16 hours ago by @sharonjc · View  

My journey with Dr. Michael Yeh and my thyroid cancer

I am so thankful for Dr. Michael Yeh who did my second thyroid cancer surgery. After removing some cancerous tumors he discovered another small one attached to my laryngeal nerve, he made the decision not to remove it because it would have changed my voice and the quality of my life. Afterwards he also said I should not have radiation (that several other doctors insisted that I get and needed), but Dr. Yeh stayed strong and said let's wait and see and continues to monitor me. It is now 2 years later and I did not have any more radiation or surgery. What a wonderful 2 years. I am so grateful. Thank you Dr. Yeh!

Login here to comment.
sclero sister

16 hours ago by @sclero sister · View  

True Compassion

I meet Dr. Elizabeth Volkmann 2 years ago, when she confirmed my Scleroderma diagnosis. After a year of dealing with doctors, it was so refreshing to find a doctor with such great bedside manner and compassion. I want to say Thank you and Happy Doctor's Day to Dr. Volkmann and all doctors out there. Thank you UCLA!

Login here to comment.
enriquerivero

17 hours ago by @enriquerivero · View  

Kidney transplant and donation education goes national

Have you ever wondered why people choose to donate a kidney? And whether these donors regret their decision later?

Amy Waterman first became interested in organ donation over 20 years ago when she conducted surveys of kidney donors as a graduate student in social psychology at Washington University in St. Louis. “It was amazing that hundreds of living donors we surveyed not only told us that they didn’t regret their decision, but also found it to be one of the most profound decisions they had ever made,” said Waterman, now an associate professor-in-residence in the division of nephrology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.
[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
tamidennis

1 day ago by @tamidennis · View  

Maybe that upset stomach is just an upset stomach – and maybe it's not

Maybe that upset stomach is just an upset stomach – and maybe it's not

An upset stomach can’t be ignored – go ahead, try it – but that doesn’t mean you should panic either, as those of us who have spent too much time Googling our various aches and pains are wont to do.

"If it lasts for a day or two, it's usually nothing to worry about," said Dr. Eric Esrailian, co-chief of the UCLA Vatche and Tamar Manoukian Division of Digestive Diseases, in a recent interview with Prevention.com.

That said, sometimes you should worry, or at least not shrug the [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
ilana1

1 day ago by @ilana1 · View  

Thank you Dr. Ashley

Dr. Robert Ashley has been my doctor for many years. He was a new doctor with UCLA Health Santa Monica Bay Physicians when I started going to him. About 3-4 years ago my mom started to go to him also. He is an EXCELLENT doctor. He is very carrying always listen and never make us feel that we came to see him unnecessarily. Even if we talk about our personal day by day life that give us stress he listen and never rush us out no matter how busy he might be. When he orders tests we know that he will call if there is a reason. We love Dr. Ashley and UCLA need to be proud to have his as [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
uclacardiofan

1 day ago by @uclacardiofan · View  

On Top of the World

Thanks to Dr. Jonathan Tobis and the UCLA Interventional Cardiology team I am alive and hiking today. In January 2004 I went to my primary doctor due to increasing fatigue, actually falling asleep driving home from work. I had an echocardiogram that revealed a birth defect that had never been diagnosed for 40+ years, a large atrial septal defect (ASD). I saw a local cardiologist who researched the best doctors to correct this, and he sent me straight to Dr. Tobis at UCLA. My husband and I were impressed not only by his clear explanation of the solution, but also his care for me as a person. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
diana b

3 days ago by @diana b · View  

Dr. Mina Ma and Dr. Leena Nathan helped me catch cancer early

I often report symptoms of various kinds to my longtime internist, Dr. Mina Ma. She has a great ability to determine what should be of concern. Fourteen years ago, she decided I should seek further help for some odd spotting. Because she knew when to be concerned, I went to Dr. Leena Nathan who after some testing, immediately sent me to a busy, outstanding surgeon and got me in quickly. UCLA surgeon Dr. Robin Farias-Eisner, completed the job with a hysterectomy. It was endometrial cancer in its earliest stage. No further treatment was needed as the cancer was confined. The expertise of these doctors , who worked incredibly quickly to get a diagnosis, prevented what might [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
puppy lover

3 days ago by @puppy lover · View  

Just met and already there for me

Dr. Angela Leung has patiently and devotedly answered all my questions, without rushing me, and has consistently generated peace of mind and confidence that I'm in good hands. I thank her for contributing prolifically to the scientific literature that directly benefits patients like me in the clinical setting.

Login here to comment.
r5150n

4 days ago by @r5150n · View  

Someone Special

I met Dr. Jennifer Grossman when she was a new rheumatologist and I was a new lupus patient. It was in the early 90's. It is now 2017 and I have been diagnosed with Breast Cancer that has spread to the bones. Dr. Grossman has always been supportive of me since we first met. I live alone with no family and my friends are elderly, retired, and live alone. Since my diagnosis Dr. Grossman has called me at home to see how I am managing. I worked as an RN for almost 50 years and I have never experienced a physician do this. She is not only the most thorough physician I have ever met but also the most compassionate. My [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
bangles

4 days ago by @bangles · View  

Tackling an illness difficult to diagnose

One morning last summer, I woke up and my feet were numb. That's when I started going from doctor to doctor trying to find out what was happening, how to get better and how to stop the progress of numbness and pain in my feet. I visited specialists in Internal medicine, Neurology, Acupuncture, but nobody had any answers or was willing to look deeper to find them. I was discouraged and sad, until I fell into the arms and knowledge of Dr. Geraldine Navarro, a Rheumatologist at UCLA Porter Ranch. Dr Navarro worked non stop to find reasons for what was going on. We are "almost" at the front door of a definite diagnosis, and with it at the beginning of treatment. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
liz1

4 days ago by @liz1 · View  

Mammogram gets personal

All women know the mammogram story. Show up, undress to the waist and put clothes in a locker, then go to a room with the technician and giant machine. Okay, did that... and then I was instructed to sit, while the technician wiped down the machine. And I thought: why didn't she do that while I was taking off my clothes? But then I realized that she (and the system) were showing me that they were protecting me, that they wanted me to see that hygiene was important and they would make sure everything was sanitary, just for me (and of course for every woman who gets a mammogram). What a smart way to do things! And that's true of every kind and type of [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
sharmy20

4 days ago by @sharmy20 · View  

Thank U Dr. Veena Ranganath

I have had the privilege of being a part of 2 studies headed by Dr. Veena Ranganath. Having a chronic illness and knowing there is no cure leaves you with very little hope. I am eternally grateful for Dr. Rangunath and her continued quest to find answers. The tiniest medical improvement or development can mean the world to a chronic sufferer. Thank you for searching for answers!

Login here to comment.
enriquerivero

4 days ago by @enriquerivero · View  

Shift in back pain guidelines favors non-medication therapies

 

When the American College of Physicians issued new guidelines for treating lower back pain last month it represented a big shift: instead of recommending prescription medications as the first line of treatment, as it had for years, the new recommendations favored non-invasive treatments such as exercise and heat therapy.

The previous guidelines, issued in 2007, recommended acetaminophen (Tylenol) and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain killer medications (NSAIDs) as first line therapy. The new guidelines removed these from first line therapy, and replaced them with non-pharmacological strategies. These medications can help, in particular NSAIDs; acetaminophen is less helpful). NSAIDs, however, have a risk of toxicity, [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
Loading information...